Category Archives: Coach

Showcases and Tournaments

Top Baseball Showcases and Tournaments For College Recruiting

Perfect Game Schedule – Click here

Having been to a large number of summer/fall showcases and tournaments, I can tell you the wasted feeling of having your son play in front of nobody.  We’ve been to tournaments where you feel there isn’t a scout within a hundred miles.  Now partly that’s on the showcase organization.  They have the opportunity to pick the tournaments well in advance and they know which ones are going to attract the most colleges.

But you want to be able to walk around and simply bump into a half-dozen college coaches on your way to the restroom!  Call it the “restroom test” or whatever you want to call it.  It’s a feeling that there are a ton of scouts watching and thank goodness my son has the opportunity to play in front of these guys, whatever the result.

So without further delay, here are my top five tournaments for college recruiting followed by my top five showcases for college recruiting.  Note, these were selected with college recruiting as the top priority versus pro-scouts, and without any hard college attendance numbers (I’m always skeptical of these numbers anyway).  It’s the “restroom test” based on our actual experiences from what we’ve seen with our own two eyes or heard from other reliable parents.

Top 5 Tournaments For College Recruiting

  1. PerfectGame – 16U WWBA National Championship (Cartersville, GA – early July)
  2. PerfectGame – 16U BCS National Championship (Ft. Myers, FL – mid July)
  3. ProspectWire – 16U Music City Classic (Nashville, TN – late July)
  4. USA Baseball – 17U National Team Championships (Goodyear, AZ – mid June)
  5. PerfectGame – WWBA Underclass World Championship (Ft. Myers, FL – Oct)

Honorable Mention:  ProspectWire – World Series (Pt. St. Lucie – late July), Prospect Select – Black Bear Classic (Greenville, SC – late June), Prospect Select – Boston Open (Boston – mid July)

Note:  The PerfectGame WWBA World Championship held in October in Jupiter, Florida, is a phenomenal tournament, but from what I saw, it was mainly for pro scouts.  Many of the players were already committed to colleges years prior.

Top 5 Showcases for College Recruiting

  1. PerfectGame – Junior National Showcase (Ft. Myers, FL – early June)
  2. PerfectGame – Fall Top Prospect National Showcase (Cartersville, GA – late Oct)
  3. PerfectGame – National Academic Showcase (Cartersville, GA – mid July)
  4. ProspectSelect – Black Bear Select (Clemson Univ, SC – late June)
  5. ProspectSelect – TOPPS Palm Beach (Palm Beach, FL – early June)

Honorable Mention:  Many large showcase travel team organizations have their own showcases in November or early January.   These showcases can attract large numbers of college coaches.  I’ve been at one where there were close to 80 colleges.  These are fantastic showcases to attend in lieu or in addition to the above.

Note: The PerfectGame National Showcase is “the” primetime national showcase.  However, mostly all the players who attend have already committed to college and this is mainly a pro-scout showcase.

Behind the Curtain

But the caveat is that your showcase travel team better play at the right venues when they get to the heavily attended tournaments.  What do I mean by that?  Well, these tournaments are huge.  200+ teams in just one age group.  Yes, that’s right.  Some have over 300 teams.  Imagine what the scheduling is like.  A nightmare.  They take every minor league complex and high school field within a 50-mile radius.

Thankfully there’s usually a hub centered around a minor league complex with eight+ fields or if you’re PerfectGame, you build a state-of-the-art complex in north Atlanta with a dozen+ fields.  The scouts, as you might imagine for efficiency reasons, congregate around these “hubs”.  It’s easier for them to see more players rather than driving 30-minutes away to some remote high school where they might just see one, maybe two, players.  Sure, the scouts will go to the remote high school but if you’re constantly playing at these remote high school fields, then your coaches better be texting or hitting the phones non-stop to get the colleges to show up.  It’s tough.  Yes, your son can send emails or texts to coaches with his tournament schedule if he knows they’re at the tournament.  But normally that’s hit or miss.

If your son plays for a larger showcase travel organization who brings 5+ teams in the same age group, then the likelihood of the best “prime” team getting to play at more “hubs” is greater than the organization who brings just two teams.  Just saying.  I have no hard evidence that this indeed happens regularly, but I’ve seen the scheduling and that’s just how it feels.

Also, with regards to showcases, be very cautious.  Some are very expensive and at the end of the day, they won’t give your son the exposure.  Some require tryouts and further progression in order to get to their national showcase.  You can spin your wheels going from tryout to tryout with little to no exposure and then be left out of their “All-American” game or national showcase in the end. Read more


Travel Baseball: The Ultimate Guide for Parents and Players

For many families, the transition from Little League to travel baseball comes with stress, anxiety and questions about what to look for in a team and what to expect from the experience — not to mention the question of whether making the switch from a more laid-back rec ball program to a more competitive (and expensive) travel club is the right decision in the first place.

What is Travel Baseball?  First, it’s important to understand what a travel baseball team is and how travel baseball is organized. There are tens of thousands of travel baseball teams around the country, and their popularity has exploded over the past two decades. As recently as the 1990s, travel baseball was a niche experience limited mostly to elite players in baseball-rich areas like Texas and California. Today, participation is seen by many as a near necessity for talented players to develop their skills and hone their game against the best competition they can find.

Whereas Little League is the dominant organization when it comes to recreational youth baseball, there are multiple organizations throughout the country that host hundreds of travel tournaments each year. Some of the biggest and most popular are USSSA (United States Speciality Sports Association), AAU (Amateur Athletic Union), Triple Crown Sports, and Perfect Game. Travel baseball teams often participate in tournaments organized by more than one of those organizations.

A team can be started by anyone. Many are formed by parents, but many others are formed by high school and former college coaches. Depending on their organizational goals, some programs have just one team that participates in one age bracket (such as 10 and under), while some are run like businesses and have teams that compete in every age group.

Here are eight things to think about when evaluating teams. These factors will make a big difference when it comes to your overall experience, so take the time to think about them, and don’t be afraid to ask questions of parents and coaches.

  1. Coaching: A coaching staff can make or break a team. How coaches manage players, keep the game fun, instill the fundamentals, and focus on development — not only as athletes, but as young men and women — is extremely important.  Some travel baseball teams have parents or grandparents serving as the head coach. While that can be fine, it’s important to make sure those coaches don’t make keeping their own child on the field a priority. Before committing to a team, spend some time researching it by watching a practice and talking to current and/or former players and parents.
  2. Cost: For many parents, this is the most terrifying aspect of travel baseball.  Just how much of a toll is this going to take on your bank account? The specific answer varies, but the typical range of cost for participating in travel baseball is between $500 and $2,500 per year. There are a number of specific factors that go into how much it costs to be on a team: * Where you live. * Whether you have to buy your own equipment. * Whether you have to rent facilities. * Whether or not coaches are paid. * How competitive the team is.
  3. Location: As stated earlier, location is a key factor in deciding which travel team to play for. If you’re fortunate enough to live in California, Florida or Texas, you’re going to have a lot of opportunities to play with and against high-level competition right in your backyard. But outside of those states, it’s a little bit tougher, and you have to decide how committed you are to playing at the highest possible level. So you’ll be faced with the following choice: play on a lower level team that’s closer to home, or drive a hundred miles or more for twice-weekly practices? It may sound crazy, but many families do just that. Why would they commit so much time and money to their son or daughter’s athletic pursuits? It comes down to goals. Better teams often provide better coaching and more opportunities for exposure to college and professional scouts.
  4. Mission: What’s the team’s mission? Is the focus on fun, player development, college exposure, or a mix of all there? Teams can have many different goals and missions, and there’s no right or wrong approach.  However, it is possible that a team’s mission does not align with your values and goals, and you need to think about this before committing, as a compatibility mismatch can lead to coach-parent and coach-player tension.
  5. Organization: Consider the reputation of the organization you’re evaluating. When you join a team, you and your son or daughter will essentially be endorsing everything the program stands for. If they’re known for dirty play or being disrespectful to the game, you’ll be associated with that. And believe it or not, the baseball world is a small and surprisingly tight-knit community. College coaches tend to know which programs produce bad apples — and they avoid them. In fact, many college coaches will completely write off an entire organization that has a reputation for not playing the game the right way or for having disrespectful players.
  6. Playing Time: There’s an important balance between getting enough playing time and being challenged. Before committing, ask the coaching staff what kind of playing time your child can expect — including at what position. If there are two returning shortstops, he or she most likely won’t be playing there and might have to learn another position. That’s not a bad thing: college coaches want players that are versatile, and many players change positions as they get older and their bodies develop.
  7. Skill Level: Be realistic about your child’s skill level, and pay attention to the level of competition around him or her at tryouts (i.e., the skill levels of the other players). If your kid has the fight and desire to compete for a spot (like they’ll have to do if they make it to college ball), then putting them on a team where they’ll be challenged is the best option. But if he or she is there to have fun and make friends, with no burning desire to be constantly improving, then choosing a travel team that’s more low-key will be the better call.
  8. What You’re Giving Up: Travel baseball tournaments are on weekends, and players often have to sacrifice certain things that are part of a normal childhood. Is your son or daughter willing to miss out on things like birthdays, sleepovers and school dances, because most of their time is spent doing homework, traveling to and from games and practices, practicing on their own (possibly including private lessons), and spending nearly every summer weekend at the ballpark?

For some, their love of the game is so great that giving up these things is a no-brainer. For others, they may regret missing out on these social activities. And that’s perfectly fine! Just be honest with each other and talk about the true costs of travel baseball — because it’s not just the sticker price.

Travel Baseball Pros and Cons

There are positives and negatives when it comes to travel baseball. Here are a few of each.

Pros:
Better competition: Players are more serious about the game and more driven to improve. This higher level of competition will help push your son or daughter to improve their own skills.
Better coaching: Travel baseball coaches tend to be better qualified, more knowledgeable, and better-connected. At the highest levels of travel ball, teams often employ former professional coaches.
More exposure: Aside from high school baseball, travel ball is the primary means of exposure to college coaches and pro scouts. Plus, travel teams often attend showcase tournaments and camps.
More games played: Travel teams play significantly more games per year than rec ball teams.
Facilitates travel: Sometimes seen as an ancillary benefit, the travel itself can be a valuable and eye-opening experience for players. Many kids don’t have an opportunity to travel out of their own area or state, and travel baseball can provide that.
Encourages character development: Because travel teams are more serious, there’s a greater emphasis put on things like being on time, demonstrating maximum effort, and having a good attitude.

Cons
Cost: Travel baseball is expensive — sometimes absurdly so. Families often spend around $2,500 per year, but the costs can be even higher.
Time commitment: Even a moderately competitive travel team can consume an entire summer’s worth of weekends.
Ultra-competitive: On most travel teams, there’s a balance between player development and winning. What you won’t often find is an “everybody plays” approach. For the most part, the best players will play the most, which makes for a highly-competitive environment.
Tougher workouts: This can be a pro or a con, depending on the player’s perspective and goals. Tougher workouts can lead to better outcomes, but they can also be mentally and physically taxing if the player isn’t fully invested.
Lack of diversity: Because travel baseball is expensive, it has often been criticized for a lack of socioeconomic and racial diversity.

Remember, this is your child’s choice to. Help them see the pros and cons of each option. And although we stated it earlier, we cannot stress this enough: you cannot dictate your son or daughter’s commitment to the game of baseball. It’s up to them. So, support them in whatever capacity they want to participate. If you do, they’ll never regret or forget the amazing experiences, friends, and lessons learned playing this great game. Read more

Tippy Martinez, retired MLB pitcher showed up after the Championship game for a “photo op”.  He was a major weapon in the 1983 Baltimore Orioles World Series Championship over the Phillies. Read more
Notice the diversity of kids.  This was another banner year because Emmanuel who batted in the 4-hole struggled all season.  However, he came alive when it counted.  He hit 2 bombs completely out of the ballpark (over 300 feet as an 11  year old).  They are still the longest balls ever hit on Memorial Field.

Travel TRYOUTS

The Panthers are looking for rising stars to join our 14U travel baseball team this coming season. Players must NOT turn 15 before May 1, 2021.

Saturday, September 5, 2020
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM 
Fullerton Park
4400 Fullerton Avenue, 21236

Those interested in a private/Covid-safe tryout need to register online and send an email to humanvacuum5@gmail.com.

About Our Program: 
FUNDAMENTALS! As Head Coach, I could not say enough about the mistakes many, many young players, parents and coaches make when it comes to teaching kids the basic ingredients of baseball.  “Repetition is the MOTHER of SKILL”.  Cal Ripken says, “Practice does not make perfect.  Rather Perfect Practice does”.

It doesn’t matter if you are 8 years old or 18 years old, the key ingredient is: Development, Playing Time and being around a Competitive Environment.  My Top 3 Goals at every practice and every game is to have FUN, do your BEST and always behave in a way that exemplifies good SPORTSMANSHIP.

Coach Brooks played little league travel baseball since he could walk and won the 18U Maryland State Championship, was a former high school athlete with over 8 varsity letters and even played competitive baseball on some semi-pro teams.  He has been coaching for over 10 years and has experience coaching on several high schools in the Baltimore area.

Scott Massengill, Assistant Coach also has enormous sports background and great attitude about the game.  He has coached for over 5 years and loves seeing players develop!

Program Features:
We will compete in the M.A.B.A. as well as Regional Tournaments in the Fall, Spring and Summer.  Approximate cost will be $500 per player (subject to change depending on sponsorships and fundraising).  We have a variety of training opportunities offered throughout the off season and in season such as position specific development clinics, indoor facilities @ Extra Innings and NCAA college player instruction.

Visit us on our TEAM HOMEPAGE

Financial Blow of the Coronavirus on Sports

Canceled games and tournaments were a major hit. Insurance policies and contracts can only help so much. No games mean no ticket sales and reduced media payments. For the first time in nearly two decades, the $160 billion sports world has gone dark.

The ramifications of canceling or postponing play are wide-ranging, from mundane considerations about competition to potentially serious financial consequences for athletes, teams, leagues and organizations, and the tens of thousands of people who work at sporting events. LeBron James, who could lose about $400,000 for every game the Los Angeles Lakers don’t play, might not get a lot of sympathy, given his riches. But there are low-paid minor league baseball players who need money for rent and food, and college field hockey teams that depend on money from the N.C.A.A. basketball tournament to fund their own seasons.

In the past, the sports business has largely proven to be somewhat recession proof. Most major sports organizations weathered the economic fallout of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and the financial crisis in 2008. The problem now is that, as a mass event business, sports cannot occur because of the risk of spreading the coronavirus, bringing everything to a screeching halt.

Major League Baseball

The MLB has been devising multiple models for its schedule, which is delayed until mid-April at the earliest. The impact will vary from team to team. The Mariners in Seattle, one of the hotbeds of the virus, may have more trouble drawing fans back to its ballpark than teams playing in areas that have fewer cases. And for competitive reasons, it will be difficult to restart the season if some M.L.B. cities still have restrictions on the size of gatherings, as is the case in San Francisco.

Teams that own their own regional sports networks may face a double-hit — no revenue from tickets and little content for their networks, though fees from cable companies may deliver a small cushion to absorb the blow. Other teams that are already losing money could see steeper losses. As players disperse from spring training, at least for a few weeks, it is possible they won’t get paid. Under the terms of baseball’s uniform player contract, the commissioner can suspend contracts during a national emergency in which games are not played. President Trump declared a national emergency on Friday afternoon.

Cities and states will also forgo collecting income taxes on the player salaries, or sales taxes, and the fees generated in and around stadiums and arenas, including in parking lots. With arenas and stadiums closed, tens of thousands of part-time workers who are paid hourly wages with no benefits have seen their paychecks disappear. They pour beers and grill hot dogs, serve food in luxury suites, scan tickets at turnstiles, work in parking lots and provide security, run the scoreboards and lighting equipment, and clean up locker rooms.

In a building with 20,000 seats, roughly 300 workers would be behind concession counters and hawking drinks in the stands. The food purveyors and suppliers will also suffer. The big question is how quickly fans will feel safe enough to start attending games again. “After the baseball strike, there were questions about whether fans were going to come back because they were fed up,” said Chris Bigelow, a food and beverage consultant. “It’s different now because there might be fans who don’t want to be next to other fans.” Read more


Major League Baseball projects $640,000 per game loss with no fans

Major League Baseball told players their prorated salaries would contribute to an average loss of $640,000 for each game over an 82-game season in empty ballparks, according to a presentation from the commissioner’s office to the union that was obtained by The Associated Press. Painting a picture of a $10 billion industry shuttered by the contagion, the 12-page document titled “Economics of Playing Without Fans in Attendance” and dated May 12 was an initial step in negotiations aimed at starting the delayed season around the Fourth of July.

Teams say the proposed method of salvaging a season delayed by the coronavirus pandemic would still cause a $4 billion loss and would give major league players 89% of revenue. They contend they lose more money with each additional game played. The players’ union, however, believes clubs would lose less money with more games. In addition, many teams and/or their owners have stakes in their regional sports network that would benefit from additional games.

MLB said 2019 revenue was 39% local gate and other in-park sources, followed by 25% central revenue, 22% local media, 11% sponsorship and 4% other. Teams fears a second wave of the coronavirus would devastate finances if renewed government restrictions cause cancellation of the postseason, which brings in $787 million in media money. The document details who pays what: $370 million by Fox, $310 million by Turner, $27 million by ESPN, $30 million by the MLB Network and $50 million from international and other.

Teams project to increase their debt from $5.2 billion last year to $7.3 billion in 2020, leaving most clubs out of compliance with the labor contract’s debt service rule. MLB’s central office increased debt by $550 million to support clubs and is seeking $650 million more credit. MLB said many teams do not have the capacity to add more debt to fund losses in 2021.

MLB and the union agreed to a March 26 deal in which players would get a prorated share of their salaries during a shortened season. As part of the agreement, $170 million in salaries are being advanced through May 24. If the season is scrapped, players are guaranteed service time equal to what they accrued in 2019, a key to gaining eligibility for salary arbitration and free agency.

Now that plans have been formulated to possibly start the season in early July in disinfected stadiums with no gate revenue, at least at the start, MLB says the current economics are not feasible. Players have said they already made a deal and see no need for change. MLB anticipates $1.788 billion central office revenue for an 82-game schedule with empty ballparks and a $1.345 billion net after expenses for MLB Advanced Media and Major League Baseball Properties. Revenue includes $155 million from sponsors (excluding the MLB Network); $112 million from consumer products, $93 million from digital such as MLB.tv and At Bat and $89 million in non-media revenue. Read more

Orioles Team Rebuilds

Pedro Severino #28 of the Baltimore Orioles hits a single in the seventh inning to load the bases against the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field

On-base plus Slugging

My favorite top 3 players on the Orioles currently is Pedro Severino, Jose Iglesias and Renato_Núñez.  


On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic calculated as the sum of a player’s on-base percentage and slugging percentage. The ability of a player both to get on base and to hit for power, two important offensive skills, are represented. An OPS of .900 or higher in Major League Baseball puts the player in the upper echelon of hitters. Typically, the league leader in OPS will score near, and sometimes above, the 1.000 mark.

H = hits
BB = bases on balls
HBP = times hit by pitch
AB = at bats
SF = sacrifice flies
TB = total bases

Read more

MLB Career OPS Leaders

On-base plus slugging (OPS) is a sabermetric baseball statistic calculated as the sum of a player’s on-base percentage and slugging average. The ability of a player both to get on base and to hit for power, two important offensive skills, are represented.

Below is the list of the top 8 Major League Baseball players in career OPS with at least 3,000 career plate appearances.  Read more


Winning Streak

Current Standings => Click Here

Last night the O’s won the series against the Phillies.  The lead changed over three times on Tuesday and they came back again strong on Wednesday with solid Infield/Outfield (IO), pitching and offense.

In fact, over the past few weeks they have beaten the Yankees and Rays.  Tonight they face the 2019 World Series Champions Washington Nationals.


The Baltimore Orioles have had some difficult years recently. In 2018, they finished with their worst record (47-115) in franchise history. Baltimore finished last in the AL East in each of the last two seasons. Their last World Series appearance came in 1983 when they defeated the Philadelphia Phillies in five games.

Baltimore amassed a huge ERA (5.18) while serving up 234 home runs. The ace of the franchise was Dylan Bundy who now plays for Los Angeles Angels. Read more

Baltimore Orioles third baseman Renato Nunuez (39), shortstop Jonathan Villar (2) and first baseman Trey Mancini (16) at Yankee Stadium.

In 2019, the Orioles (54-108) were just as bad. In 2020, these Orioles took some steps forward and should improve. Read more


Back in April 2016, I had an exciting weekend.  The Orioles beat the World Series Champions – Kansas City Royals 8-3.  The Birds record is 11-5 as of Saturday. Our Over 40 team, Brewers beat the Nationals 15-2 and our record is now 2-0. The Roland Park Rangers travel team beat the TowsonTowne Tbirds 6-5 and continue to remain undefeated this season (record 5-0). Our RPBL In-house team (9-10 Nationals Little League) the Blaze beat the Ironbirds 5-3 and we have a 2 game winning streak (record 3-1-1).

Here are some quotes to pump you up:

  1. Every game is game seven.
  2. Teamwork makes the Dream work.
  3. Attitude is Everything.
  4. Be prepared! “If only” are the famous last words of those who weren’t.

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Take me out to the Ballpark

ROLAND PARK BASEBALL LEAGUES

RPBL is proud to be sponsoring a Night at the Yard for the THIRD year in a row!!!
Click here to DOWNLOAD FLYER

Baltimore ORIOLES vs. Los Angeles ANGELS

FRIDAY, MAY 10, 2019 @ 7:05 PM

ONLY $10.00

Upper Reserve Section 344-354 (Rows 13-25).  The individual ticket price is normally $17.00 for Upper Reserve. Additional 10% transaction fee ($1.00 per ticket).  If you are having trouble connecting to MLB ticket order entry site, copy & paste the following url into your browser address bar: www.orioles.com/rolandpark

 

INTANGIBLE VALUE
What do people learn going to a professional baseball game? Well, if you have never been before, it’s FUN! Not to mention, Camden Yards is considered one of the BEST stadiums in Major League Baseball in the entire country.  It’s both exciting and entertaining.  It can be very competitive and suspenseful depending on the pitchers.

As a Head Coach for over 10 years, I am a “student of the game” and continue to learn new things going to a live baseball game. In my own experience, the benefits are countless!

Whether you are going with your son or going as a team, it’s a great bonding experience.  Plus, the coach often can learn more about the player be better able to relate to them.  Best of all, the kids witness first-hand, real time some of the best professionals in a chosen field of discipline – baseball. Watching MLB players performing at the highest level of skill is awesome, especially when you consider how much they are getting paid.

Coaches and baseball teams can build on all the PRACTICE hours, days and weeks trying to run drills by explaining situations and the reasons why.  There is also a well-known FACT in the “Art of Pedogogy” – people can learn from reading it in a book, listening, watching or doing.

Teaching fundamental skills is very difficult if you don’t have much passion, interest and some natural ability. Read more

 

60 Game Season


What you need to know about 60-game season

Baseball is back. Three glorious words.

After months of unsuccessful negotiating with the players’ association, MLB has imposed a 2020 season and the two sides have agreed on health and safety protocols.

The new season will not, however, include a few of the rule changes you may have recently read about.

Here are all the details you need to know about baseball’s shortened upcoming season.

When does the MLB regular season start?
Opening Day will be July 23, with two games taking place — Yankees vs. Nationals and Giants vs. Dodgers. The Phillies will begin play on July 24. MLB will attempt to cram 60 games into about 66 days. Players reported to camp on July 1 for Spring Training II.

How many games?
It will be a 60-game regular season. The league had proposed as few as 50 games and the players’ association had proposed as many as 114. In the end, 60 was the number the league chose when it unilaterally implemented the 2020 season.

Given MLB’s new coronavirus cases, the league’s desire to play the postseason in October, and the length these negotiations took, a regular season much longer than 60 games was no longer feasible. But the players still rejected the league’s 60-game proposal for a few important reasons. Read more

It began and suddenly halted four months ago in spring training and then restarted as summer camp. Now, filled with trepidation the time has come.

It’s the 2020 Major League Baseball season.

It finally has arrived, 119 days later than originally scheduled, and will be the first major team sport to return to the world beginning at 7:08 p.m. ET Thursday with the defending World Series champion Washington Nationals playing the New York Yankees in the nation’s capital.

There will be no fans in attendance. Only cardboard cut-outs. Pumped-in fake crowd noise required by every team. No smell of hot dogs. Virtual advertising everywhere you look. Players sitting in the stands and makeshift dugouts, socially distancing, six feet apart. And there will be displays of social messaging too, with players permitted to wear “Black Lives Matter” or “United for Change’’ patches on their uniforms, with “Black Lives Matter” stenciled on the pitcher’s mounds during the opening weekend of games. Read more


M.L.B. Proposes an 82-Game Season Starting in July

The Korean Baseball Organization is back from the coronavirus shutdown. Is this what MLB games will look like? In South Korea and Taiwan, where its league also recently resumed the season, stadiums are empty except for players, staff, umpires and some media members. Base coaches and umpires must wear masks and latex gloves on the field, and the teams’ training staffs wear masks in the dugouts. Read more

Major League Baseball has formalized its plan to return to the field, with teams agreeing Monday on a proposal to send to the players’ union for an 82-game season that would start without fans in early July. The plan would include an expanded playoff field and the designated hitter for all games, even those in the National League, where it is not typically used.

The plan must clear major obstacles to become reality. Even if the union accepts the structure of a truncated season, the sides would also have to agree on a salary structure for players. The league would also need to have enough tests for players and employees without depleting the public supply, and agree with the union on working conditions, including protocols in case of positive tests.

Details of the proposal were confirmed by multiple baseball officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because the plan cannot be official until authorized by the union. The league’s proposal would authorize the shortest season since the early years of the National League in the late 1870s. To minimize travel, teams would play only against divisional rivals as well as teams in the corresponding geographic division of the opposite league. The proposal, which would require approval from the players’ union, would have teams start the season in early July and mainly play teams in their geographic region. Read more

“Needs to get approval by the Players’ Association, the Mets and every other team in the National League East should anticipate…” Read more

MLB Reportedly Considering Playing in Empty Stadiums During Coronavirus Pandemic. Major League Baseball is reportedly considering starting the 2020 season with games at spring training sites in either Florida or Arizona without fans in attendance because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reported Friday the chances of playing games at home parks this summer with a crowd are becoming “increasingly remote,” leading the league to consider alternatives. However, trying to station all 30 clubs in one area would be “extremely complex and potentially controversial” amid COVID-19. There are numerous hurdles MLB would need to jump before making the plan reality. Read more

“The owners of the 30 MLB teams held a virtual meeting Monday and agreed to a proposal for the restart of the 2020 season. Commissioner Rob Manfred is presenting that proposal to the players Tuesday. That’s the good news. The bad news is this: It’s a long journey from proposal to playing, largely because so many things that have to happen are out of MLB’s hands…” Read more

Whiff (Swing and a Miss)

What is it called when you strike out 3 times in a game?

Joe DiMaggio recalled he had more difficulty batting against Harder than just about any other pitcher, hitting only . 180 lifetime against him, striking out 3 times in one game in 1940. His nickname was the chief and he played his entire career with the Cleveland Indians. Read more

Everyone often remembers the great batters (offensive players), but forget who were the amazing pitchers (defensive players) in baseball. For example, ask a young player today if he’s heard of Tom Seaver, Nolan Ryan or the “Rocket” Roger Clemens? Often you’ll get a response, “never heard of them”. However, Mel Harder is the notorious pitcher who struck out DiMaggio. Read more

Strike 3 (Times Five). Giancarlo Stanton’s Whiffs Make the Record Books

When Giancarlo Stanton struck out for the fifth time on Sunday and left the field at Yankee Stadium to a chorus of boos, he was not merely having a bad game. He was putting himself in the record books. And there may well be more record-breaking, of the wrong kind, to come. Read more


This morning I “googled” the number of times a MLB player struck out 3 times in one game. Unfortunately, my son Blake struck out 3 times yesterday in a “single elimination playoff game” against some of the BEST 13 year old boys in the region.

In slang, when a batter strikes out three times in a game, he is said to have completed a hat trick. If he strikes out four times, it is called a golden sombrero. He receives a platinum sombrero if he strikes out five times, and this dishonor is also known as the Olympic Rings.

Age (years) 50th percentile height for boys in inches (feet)

8 50.4 in. (4.2′)
9 52.6 in.
10 54.5 in. (4.5′)
11 56. 4 in.
12 58.7 in. (4.9′)
13 61.4 in. (5.1′)
14 64.6 in.
15 66.9 in.
16 68.3 in.
17 69.1 in.
18 69.3 in. (5.8′)

Strikeout

In baseball or softball, a strikeout (or strike-out) occurs when a batter racks up three strikes during a time at bat. It usually means the batter is out. A strikeout is a statistic recorded for both pitchers and batters, and is denoted by K. A “strikeout looking”—in which the batter does not swing and the third strike is called by the umpire—is usually denoted by a ꓘ.[1]

Although a strikeout suggests that the pitcher dominated the batter, the free-swinging style that generates home runs also leaves batters susceptible to striking out. Some of the greatest home run hitters of all time—such as Alex Rodriguez, Reggie Jackson, and Jim Thome—were notorious for striking out.

Rules
A pitched ball is ruled a ball by the umpire if the batter did not swing at it and, in that umpire’s judgement, it does not pass through the strike zone. Any pitch at which the batter swings unsuccessfully or, that in that umpire’s judgement passes through the strike zone, is ruled a strike. Each ball and strike affects the count, which is incremented for each pitched ball with the exception of a foul ball on any count with two strikes. That is, a third strike may only occur by the batter swinging and missing at a pitched ball, or the pitched ball being ruled a strike by the umpire with no swing by the batter. A pitched ball that is struck by the batter with the bat on any count, and is not a foul ball or foul tip, is in play. A batter may also strike out by bunting, even if the ball is hit into foul territory.

A pitcher receives credit for (and a batter is charged with) a strikeout on any third strike, but a batter is out only if one of the following is true:

The third strike is pitched and caught in flight by the catcher (including foul tips);
On any third strike, if a baserunner is on first and there are zero or one outs;
The third strike is bunted foul and is not caught by a fielder.
Thus, it is possible for a batter to strike out, but still become a runner and reach base safely if the catcher is unable to catch the third strike cleanly, and he then does not either tag out the batter or force him out at first base. In Japan, this is called furinige (振り逃げ), or “swing and escape”. In Major League Baseball, it is known as an uncaught third strike. When this happens, a strikeout is recorded for both the pitcher and the batter, but no out is recorded. Because of this, a pitcher may occasionally be able to record more than three strikeouts in one half-inning.

It is also possible for a strikeout to result in a fielder’s choice. With the bases loaded and two strikes with two outs, the catcher drops the ball or catches it on the bounce. The batter-runner is obliged to run for first base and other base-runners are obliged to attempt to advance one base. Should the catcher field the ball and step on home plate before the runner from third base can score, then the runner from third base is forced out. Read more

NBA

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a men’s professional basketball league in North America, composed of 30 teams (29 in the United States and 1 in Canada). It is one of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada, and is widely considered to be the premier men’s professional basketball league in the world.

1988 NBA Slam Dunk Contest

Michael Jordan vs. Dominique Wilkins

The league was founded in New York City on June 6, 1946, as the Basketball Association of America (BAA). It changed its name to the National Basketball Association on August 3, 1949, after merging with the competing National Basketball League (NBL). The NBA’s regular season runs from October to April, with each team playing 82 games. Its playoffs extend into June. NBA players are the world’s best paid athletes by average annual salary per player.

The NBA is an active member of USA Basketball (USAB), which is recognized by FIBA (also known as the International Basketball Federation) as the national governing body for basketball in the United States. The league’s several international as well as individual team offices are directed out of its head offices in Midtown Manhattan, while its NBA Entertainment and NBA TV studios are directed out of offices located in Secaucus, New Jersey. (Read more)

Standings

Any predictions on the final four this year? I’m rooting for my Alma Mater – MD Terps – Ranked #7. AP College Basketball Poll Week 16 Rankings

  1. Baylor
  2. Gonzaga
  3. Kansas
  4. San Diego State
  5. Dayton
  6. Duke
  7. Maryland

Click here

Ravens fall apart

What a dissappointment!!!

However there is a learning OPPORTUNITY…

Never get too “over confident”.

Interception early in 1st quarter, 4th down conversions and penalties destroyed the Ravens offense.

They beat themselves.

Tennessee had more gusto and enthusiasm.

Discipline. Focus. Running game prevailed.

Being from Baltimore and originally a Colts fan, it’s hard not to predict that the Ravens are definitely going to win the National Championship this year.

Their quarterback has so many weapons including his amazing ability to run the football.

Lamar Demeatrice Jackson Jr. is an American football quarterback for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League. He played college football at Louisville where he won the Heisman Trophy, Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, and was unanimously selected as an All-American as a sophomore in 2016. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lamar_Jackson?wprov=sfla1

Super Bowl LIV 2020 will be at 6:30 PM on
Sunday, February 2.

The NFL has decided on the locations of the 2019, 2020 and 2021 Super Bowls.

The vote took place at the NFL owners meetings in Charlotte on Tuesday.

Atlanta will host Super Bowl LIII in 2019, while South Florida (Miami) will get the event in 2020 and Los Angeles will host in 2021.

https://www.nbcsports.com/washington/ravens/nfl-announces-locations-2019-2020-and-2021-super-bowls

Super Bowl 35 was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion Baltimore Ravens and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion New York Giants to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2000 season.

Super Bowl XXXV

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super_Bowl_XXXV?wprov=sfla1

Indoor Training Facilities

If you are like most teams, finding an indoor facility can be challenging. Here is a list of facilities in the local area:

The Cages Baseball Training Center

Address: 1201 Pauls Lane Joppa, MD 21085
Website: Click here
Phone: 443-504-2345 | 443-619-5236
Email: rmdbaseball@yahoo.com

In the Net

Address: 798 Airport Road Palmyra, PA 17078
Website: Click here
Phone: 717-838-8706 | 888-408-9119
Email: sue@inthenet.com

Extra Innings

Address: 7904 Rossville Boulevard Baltimore, MD 21236
Website: Click here
Phone: 410-665-6789
Email: info@extrainnings-baltimorenorth.com

Maryland Sportsplex

Address: 5200 Glen Arm Road Glen Arm, MD 21057
Website: Click here
Phone: 410-510-7418
Email: mdsplx@marylandsportsplex.com

Coppermine Fieldhouse

Address: 4 Hamill Road Baltimore, MD 21210
Website: Click here
Phone: 410-337-7781
Email: info@copperminefieldhouse.com

PerformFit Sports Experience

Address: 10880 Railroad Avenue Cockeysville, MD 21030
Website: Click here
Phone: 410-785-2600

Elite Prospects Athletic Complex

Address: 10900 Gilroy Road, Unit L Hunt Valley MD, 21031
Website: Click here
Phone: 410-329-1400  |  410-808-7779
Email: jimmy.parisiEPAC@gmail.com

Harford Sports Performance Center

Address: 121 Industry Lane Forest Hill, MD 21050
Website
: Click here
Phone: 410-420-8442
Email: harfordsports@gmail.com

Professional Baseball Training

Address: 6541 Baltimore National Pike Catonsville, MD 21228
Website: Click here
Phone: 443-250-5712

Bases Training Facility

Curtis Business Center 713 E. Ordnance Road, Suite 319 Baltimore, MD 21226
Website: Click here

Biggest indoor facility in the midwest

Elite – Wyoming, MI
Website: Click here

Bat Guidelines


2020 – Fourteen and Under

My son Blake turns thirteen at the end of the year and he has spent the past couple of years in 12U Leagues getting comfortable with drop 10 USSSA and USA bats. He is only 4’10” and 100 lbs.

Using the “Bat Sizing Chart” it recommends 30 inch length.

However, he has been having a lot of success using a 31″ 21 lb. (-10) so moving to the heavier bats is going to be a big adjustment.

To use the bat size chart below, all you have to do is follow these simple steps: * Move the top slider on the chart to the player’s height range * Move the bottom slider on the chart to the player’s weight range Click here

I’ve reached out to my network and most coaches replied, “it depends on the league”. Also, it was pointed out that the “increased bat weight is offset in significant part by the increased distance from the pitching rubber to home plate. The 12U game at an advanced level can be more challenging than the 13U due to the infield dimensions.”

From the Desk of Matt Tyner, Head Baseball Coach, Towson Tigers

“Age 13 is big field time. The transition is the great equalizer. It’s the separation mechanism that makes young players play a different sport. Very seldom does a young player dominate on the big field, Bbcor bats etc. if there is one that does, he’s easily identified. Take it in stride. Speed is the key.”

Convoluted Needs of 13U Players

Getting the right bats for a 13u player is far more complicated than any other age. Not only do a variety of bat standards apply depending on context, but BBCOR bats are looming in the near future for players who hope to continue playing in high school.

Nearly all 14u travel ball tournaments require players to swing BBCOR bats. So let’s say you turn 13 in April of 2018. Starting August 1, 2018, you’ll be using a BBCOR bat in travel ball games. Some 13u players are required to start using BBCOR earlier than that as part of a middle school baseball program or if playing on a 14u team.

It is much, much easier for players to swing a light bat than a heavy bat. At the younger ages, many players have poor hitting mechanics, and the quickest fix for that is to switch to a bat that is so light that it can be used to good effect in spite of poor mechanics and/or lack of strength.

Some kids who never develop good swing mechanics continue to use a light bat until they are forced to switch to BBCOR at the age of 14. I see some players on my son’s 13u and 14u PONY division swinging drop 10 bats. Switching to BBCOR (combined with better pitching) from a drop 10 bat is so drastic that typically, mechanics change for the worse and hitting results plummet. The switch to BBCOR contributes to some players deciding to quit the game.

The local coaches with whom I’ve discussed BBCOR have all said that it’s very helpful to practice with increased weight for many months before BBCOR bats are required. So it might look something like this:

January through May of 13u year: Use a drop 8 bat for games, drop 5 off the tee. Even better if a player is big/strong enough to start with such heavy bats at an earlier age, but many players won’t be big enough until they’re 13.
June and July: Use a drop 5 bat for games, BBCOR off a tee
August: Begin using BBCOR always as a 14u.
Also helpful is to regularly do calisthenics such as pushups, pullups, crunches, planks, and squats.

It’s very important to maintain good mechanics when switching to a heavier bat. It can be helpful to practice with the heavier bat off a tee, being careful to focus on good mechanics, rather than just at batting practice and games where the player will focus more on hand eye coordination than mechanics. Read more

BBCOR (Bat-Ball Coefficient of Restitution) is something you’ve probably heard a lot about; it’s the standard currently governing adult baseball bats used in High School and Collegiate play. Rather than measuring the ratio of the ball exit speed to pitch and bat speeds, BBCOR measures the trampoline effect of the bat.

-3 is BBCOR. That’s high school and college. USSSA is what we used this year. They should allow USA also.

I think 14U is usually BBCOR. 13U leagues are sometimes BBCOR.

14U & Below: You may use either a 2 5/8″ or 2 3/4″ barrel diameter with a maximum allowed length of 36 inches. Your bat must feature either the USSSA 1.15 BPF certification or the BBCOR .50 certification.

All bats must be stamped BBCOR. Wood bats allowed. 19u: To be considered a wood bat, a bat must be made of a single piece of wood. All other bats such as bamboo or two piece must meet the BBCOR standards and have the BBCOR stamp

Adult baseball bats must have a -3 length to weight ratio and 2” barrel. In high school and collegiate sanctioned leagues, bats must be 31″-34″ long to be legal.

BEST BASEBALL BATS FOR HIGH SCHOOL
  • Easton Beast (X Speed BBCOR)-High School/College (-3 Drop)
  • Marucci MCBC7 (Cat7 BBCOR)
  • Louisville Slugger Omaha (517 BBCOR -3)
  • Rawlings Velo (Hybrid Balanced BBCOR) High School /College.
  • Louisville Slugger Solo (617 BBCOR-3)

Read more

Additional References

2019 – Twelve and Under

In 2018, many league requirements forced players to purchase new, and expensive, bats that complied with the USA Bat Policy (i.e. bats stamped with the “USA Baseball” logo). However, this year they have reversed course so now the “old” USSSA bats will once again be permitted for league play along with USA Bats.

Bats come down to personal preference, so if your player is happy with a USA bat, he can continue to use it. However, most kids prefer the older, big barrel (2 5/8″) USSSA bats as they have more pop which results in the ball travelling farther when hit. Right now, you can find tons of quality used bats USSSA bats on e-Bay at a fraction of their original cost and most are lightly used and come with new grips, making them feel like new bats. Another option would be to search local, used sporting goods retailers but that takes more leg work than shopping on-line. Please note that while 2 5/8″ barrels are approved, 2 3/4″ barrels are not approved for HCTB play; however, some tournaments may permits the use of those bats.

Be sure to check your individual league website for updates and information on bat restrictions.

2019 Bat Rules

Age Group Bats
8U-10U USSSA BPF 1.15 2 ¼” Barrel or USA Bat (No barrel restrictions)
11U-12U USSSA BPF 1.15 2 ¼” or 2 5/8” Barrel or USA Bat (No barrel restrictions)
13U USSSA BPF 1.15 2 ¼” or 2 5/8” Barrel, USA Bat (No barrel restrictions), or BBCOR
14U-19U BBCOR Only
Some of the best USSSA Baseball Bats
  • DeMarini CF Zen -10 Senior League Baseball Bat (WTDXCBZ-18)
  • Easton Ghost X -10 Senior League Baseball Bat (SL18GX10)
  • Marucci Hex Alloy 2 -10 Senior League Baseball Bat (MSBHA2X10)
  • Louisville Slugger Solo 618 -10 Senior League Baseball Bat (WTLSLS618X10)
  • COMBAT MAXUM -10 Senior League Baseball Bat (SL8MX210)

Effective January 1st, 2018

USA Baseball is introducing a NEW standard. Traditionally, rules were always based on age groups. For example, 12U players are allowed to use baseball bats up to thirty-three (33) inches in length and less than two and one-quarter (2¼) inches in diameter. Now the new rule requires that bat barrels up to 2 5/8 inch barrel diameter are REQUIRED to carry the new USABat stamp.

USSSA has had a stated 1.15 BPF Small Barrel (2¼” barrels) and Big Barrel (2⅝” and 2¾” barrel bats) baseball bat performance standard in its rule book for 6 years for its sanctioned programs up to and including its 14U program. Read more

Traditionally, there has long been some confusion on the specific weight/length ratio limits, as well as the composition differences between wood, metal (aluminium), composite and BBCOR. When you move up to 13U they can use thirty-four (34) inch bats, and composite is allowed if BBCOR barrel is no larger than 2 5/8. Read more | Bat Standards | Announcement

Youth Baseball Bats that feature a 2 1/4 inch barrel diameter and are often lighter, with a length to weight ratio between -8 and -13. Youth bats are sometimes referred to as small barrel bats or Little League baseball bats, and are used by players that play in leagues that mandate a bat with a 2 1/4 inch barrel. Most will be Little League approved bats and should also be legal in one or more of the following associations: Babe Ruth, Dixie, Pony, AABC, or USSSA. If you’re in search of youth baseball bat sales, check out our Closeout Youth Bats or Youth Bat Packs page for discount bats and great deals! Read more


The new USA Baseball bat standard (USABat), which will apply to bats that are classified below the NCAA and NFHS level of play, will be implemented on January 1, 2018, allowing the bat manufacturers sufficient time to bring these bats to the marketplace.

Similar to the NCAA and NFHS BBCOR standard, which helped to eliminate discrepancies with different length bats and thus provide a more direct measure of bat performance, the new USA Baseball bat standard will allow youth baseball organizations in the United States to reach their goal of establishing a wood-like standard, a standard that will provide for the long-term integrity of the game.

There will be no immediate change to youth baseball organizations’ bat rules. All bats, currently accepted for the respective leagues, remain permissible through December 31, 2017. Each participating national member organization will incorporate the new standard into their rules for the 2018 season and will begin, with this announcement, to inform their membership of the USABat standard.

Frequently Asked Questions about the USABat standard:

Which national member organizations are implementing this new standard?
To date, the following organizations are participating (in alphabetical order): American Amateur Baseball Congress (AABC), Babe Ruth Baseball/Cal Ripken Baseball, Dixie Youth Baseball, Little League Baseball and PONY Baseball.

Why the change to a wood-like standard?
USA Baseball’s national member organizations believe that a wood-like performance standard will best provide for the long-term integrity of the game. The new standard will not have a drop-weight limit, so young players can use bats made with light-weight materials.

Why not just use wood bats?
Wood is a scarce resource. The new bats will be designed to perform much like wood, where its performance will be limited to the highest performing wood.

How is the USABat standard different from the BBCOR standard used by the NCAA and NFHS?
Both the USA Baseball and NCAA bat performance tests are based on the coefficient of restitution from a bat-ball impact. The scale of results is different, however, since they use different test balls and test speeds. The testing difference is necessary to address the various levels of play in the respective age groups.

Why is USA Baseball involved?
The national member organizations asked USA Baseball as the national governing body to take the lead in this process to establish a new standard. Many other national governing bodies set and enforce standards for the equipment in their respective sports. To that end, USA Baseball established a Bat Study Committee of leading scientists and conducted theoretical modeling, field testing and lab testing. The committee shared its findings with the national member organizations, who then endorsed the new USABat standard.

Why wait until 2018?
The implementation date of 2018 will allow bat manufacturers sufficient time to conduct the appropriate research, design, testing, manufacturing and shipping needed to get new bats into retail outlets. This date also allows the participating national member organizations adequate time to educate their memberships of the USABat standard.

Is my current bat good for league play?
Yes. Current league-approved bats can be used through December 31, 2017.

Is safety the reason for the change?
No. Youth baseball continues to be one of the safest of all sports for youth participants.

How will I know which bat to buy?
All new bats that bear the USABat licensing mark will be permissible for play in the leagues and tournaments of the participating youth baseball organizations.

When can I buy the new bat?
It is the intention of the bat manufacturers to make the new bats available in the fall of 2017, in sufficient time for the 2018 season. Read more


Other bat retailers I recommend include:

Cooperstown

Watch my summer slide show – Click here

2019 RPBL Rangers ranked 35/104 after 6 game seeding round. Season ended early on Wednesday, August 21.

Opening Ceremony

Wyatt hits Grand Slam (team’s first home run) in Game 4 which was a major turning point.

Blake on the mound in Game 7 – Elimination round

Visit Ted Winstead’s amazing photo gallery – Click here



Two powerful hitters, two dominant starters and two lights-out relievers.  Six Hall of Fame legends, all a part of the Class of 2019 at the Baseball Hall of Fame.  The game’s newest immortals take their bow July 19-22.  More than 50 Hall of Famers are scheduled to be in Cooperstown to honor the Class of 2019 at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum – Harold Baines, Roy Halladay, Edgar Martinez, Mike Mussina, Mariano Rivera and Lee Smith Induction on July 21, 2019. Read more


I am sincerely grateful to simply be here in Cooperstown to watch my son Blake play in these tournaments. I hope he has fun and will remember this forever!  Visit Dream Park and All-Star Village.

When Blake and I first arrived we went straight to the museum and took a picture of #10 Chipper Jones. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2018. Click here

2019 Results: LTRC Comets seeded 19 out of 50 and made it to “Sweet 16”. Click here

2018 Results: Harrison Hurricanes Click here Bergen County Hawks (NJ) Click here LI Sharks Sharks Click here

My week in review – Click here. Some interesting trivia below: We finished preliminary seeding week 79/104 with a record of 1 and 5 averaging 10.83 runs allowed per game.

Base Running

What do you do when you hit the ball? How do you get a hit? Read “Lost Art of Bunting“. Even after a 3rd dropped strike with nobody on 1st base and less than 2 outs. Fortunately, I live near Al Bumbry and have spoken to him multiple times in person. Read more

Earlier this year during “Winter Spring Training” Al gave my son Blake a lesson on taking a lead off of 1st base. It was almost identical to Coach Justin above.

Rickey Henderson

He is my all time favorite!!! When I went up to Cooperstown last year I was in tears watching Rickey interview and how he played the game. Read more

Rickey Henderson was the fastest, most aggressive base runner I have ever watched play baseball. His stats and success speak for themselves. Notice he has 1,406 lifetime stolen bases, appeared in 2 World Series games and 10 All-Star games.

If there was ever the PERFECT Lead-Off hitter, it was definitely Rickey Henderson

THE LEADOFF: Your leadoff should be one of your team’s best hitters and fastest players. The goal of any good leadoff hitter is to get on base, however they can. Your on-base percentage leader should fit well in the leadoff spot, if you’re keeping track of that stat. Remember, whether they hit the ball for contact or they walk, they’ve got to get on base. Speed is a plus for this position. Don’t look for power in the leadoff—save power hitters for later when there are more baserunners positioned. If your kids are competing for this spot, remind them that the leadoff hitter usually only leads once.

Below are some other interesting links:

Wally Backman

Reference Our Bench Coach on the 12U RPBL Rangers A Travel Team told me about Wally. Watch his YouTube video of getting a lead on 1st Base